The Art of Ryan Francis

The art website of Ryan Francis

Ryan's Recomended Fonts


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Ryan’s Recommended Fonts

I find a majority of my fonts from Blambot, Comicraft, and Da Font. I also use resources like Font Meme and Art of the Title and various comic covers to look up fonts from existing logos and advertisements. For examples of how I use it, check out my article on lettering Incident at the Game Store!

This is a tiny list of fonts that I like and recommend making their first comics with.

Back Issues BB – It’s another nice starter font for dialogue in comics that I’ve used in my comics.

Damn Noisy Kids BB – This is a good starter sound effect font with big letters. I used this in Incident at the Game Store and Shirley’s Day.

Torn Asunder BB – This another good starter sound effect font with no serifs it looks like a good “organic” sounds.

Mumble Grumble – This is a font I never knew I would need until I found it! This is great for putting unreadable text or dialogue to fill out a drawing of a book page in comic or unintelligible speaking.

Pottymouth BB – This font is good for those cartoony cursing images. It’s nice for a quick censorship in case you get reprimanded in the editing process for the bad language.

Pixelated – If you need to write something in pixels this is a font that I like.

WhoopAss BB – This is slowly starting to be my big default design font for all of my promotional stuff. It’s super thick and legible and it’s decent looking.

This is but a small list of fonts you can use to letter your comics, but if you want more of a handmade feel, you can learn lettering and calligraphy for yourself, or use Calligraphr or Font Lab to create your own fonts! If you have anymore places to download or make fonts and lettering, drop a comment and share with everyone!


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Let’s Make A Comic Story Part 7: Lettering

Lettering is definitely a discipline that I’ve never been taught when I was in college. But, after hunting for a variety of articles and getting some tips the few pro letterers I encounter in my life, I’ve managed to teach myself how to letter with some amount of competence. I’m lettering this as I prep my ink stuff as I don’t plan to color the comic at the moment.

The first step is to save my cropped unedited artwork as high res PNGs. Since, I’m making them with print in mind, I need the images in as high of a resolution as possible so it won’t get hurt too much when I reduce the final comic down to print or web.

I usually do my lettering in Adobe Illustrator as it gives me more options to mess with my text than just Photoshop or Manga Studio. I make a new file with six art boards to the pixel size of the pages I plan to import.

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